3 Matters to Consider when Preparing for Next Year’s Garden

potting bench

Every year in the fall I assess my garden by walking around, taking pictures and making notes in a small note book. I do this because come spring many of my plants have died back and I won’t remember what the garden looked like. You can certainly make changes now but I find that it  is much easier to move and divide plants as they come up in the spring and I always worry that we might get some early bad weather which might not give the plants enough time to re-established themselves before winter.

Plants That Have Overstayed Their Welcome

Make a note for those plants which have overgrown their space. Maybe they are in the way like the geranium below which is covering half of the sidewalk, or encroaching on other plants territory like the begonia. You can simply dig up some of the plant material and move it to another location or give it away to someone as a gift.

Find out what you can do now to prepare for your garden next year. Here are 3 matters to consider which will give you a jump start on next year's garden.

This Geranium is covering half of the sidewalk.

 

Find out what you can do now to prepare for your garden next year. Here are 3 matters to consider which will give you a jump start on next year's garden.

This Begonia is crowding the chives.

Lonely Spaces and Opportunities for Plant Shopping

Make a note of bare spots and areas which could use a new plant to round out your landscape. Below is a spot that once contained a beautiful lavender plant. I was hoping that it would come back after I pruned away the dead areas, but all that grew were a few weeds and the neighboring geranium. This gives me a place to plant a new lavender next year or perhaps something else grabs my attention.

Find out what you can do now to prepare for your garden next year. Here are 3 matters to consider which will give you a jump start on next year's garden.

Death of a Lavender plant that never came back after a harsh winter.

Poor Plant Growth = Relocation

Take note of any plants that just haven’t done well. If this is the first year you’ve grown this plant you may want to give it another chance. However, sometimes a plant just doesn’t seem suited to one area even after you’ve tried following the growing instructions for light and water requirements. In addition, you may no longer like something that you originally thought was a good idea. You can move the plant to a better suited area or give it away. For example the Hydrangea ‘Blue Billow’ below has been in the same place for more than three years. I hasn’t bloomed very well and it should probably have grown larger then the 24 inches it currently reaches. It may not be getting enough sun in this spot and/or it may be competing with the roots of the red maple. So I think it will be time to move it come spring.

Find out what you can do now to prepare for your garden next year. Here are 3 matters to consider which will give you a jump start on next year's garden.

I hope you found this post helpful and will take time some time now to evaluate what is happening so that you will have head start on what needs to be done for next year’s garden. It’s an easy and worthwhile task and it gives you an excuse to plan what you might buy during the winter while browsing through the beautiful plant catalogs.

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Find out what you can do now to prepare for your garden next year. Here are 3 matters to consider which will give you a jump start on next year's garden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Patti Estep

Patti is the creator of Garden Matter, a home and garden blog filled with projects to inspire your creative side. She loves crafting, gardening, decorating and entertaining at her home in Pennsylvania. When she is not working on a project at home or searching for treasures at nurseries and thrift stores with her girlfriends, you’ll probably find her with family and friends, at a restaurant, or home party enjoying new and different food adventures.

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Comments

  1. Loved this article…I’m just starting to garden and never knew you had to do that. Do you mental take notes or literally take notes that you keep until spring?

    • Thanks. I’m glad you liked it. To answer your question.
      I use a notebook. I sometimes will draw different areas and make notes where my problems are. Then I refer back later and usually I make a list of “things to do” and “things to buy” on the computer for the spring.

  2. This is a fabulous idea. I have a number of things I want to move but even though I could probably transplant them year around here in CA I doubt I will have time before Spring. My yard is a mess due to the heat this year so I have plenty of work to do before the days grow short. I love the idea of pictures and notes so I can plan during the winter, I get so excited once Spring arrives that I frequently buy without a plan.
    Traci

    • Traci,
      I totally know what you mean which is why I wrote this post. It seems like a simple thing but I often forget all the little things I did not like come spring. Living in CA must be wonderful. I’m in Pennsylvania where there is a long cold winter ahead. Planning helps and keeps me dreaming of spring.
      Have a great weekend.
      Patti

      • I’ve heard that CA is very different depending on what part you live. I’ve only visited San Diego once but would love to vacation there someday. You are so right about the grass being greener. I hope you get your wish soon. …Patti

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